Two drivers who allegedly provided carpooling services during the circuit breaker period have had their vehicles seized.
Two vehicles seized after drivers caught carpooling The Land Transport Authority (LTA) said on 15 April 2020 in an advisory that it had classified carpooling as a non-essential service PHOTO: ST FILE

Two drivers who allegedly provided carpooling services during the circuit breaker period have had their vehicles seized, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) said on 25 April 2020.

Both were driving sedans, with one stopped in Yio Chu Kang Road and the other in Handy Road.

Carpooling was outlawed last week when the Transport Ministry revoked a law that allowed it to be carried out under some conditions, including through services provided by GrabHitch, Rydepool or those arranged privately. People now offering such services face fines of up to $10,000 and/or jail of up to six months.

While commercial firms have suspended operations, some drivers continue to offer rides privately through messaging platforms.

The LTA said on Saturday that such "irresponsible behaviour" endangers the health of drivers, passengers and their families, and undermines efforts to suppress the spread of Covid-19.

Drivers are deemed to be carpooling if they use private cars and charge for ferrying passengers. Anyone offering such services can be reported to the LTA through the OneMotoring portal.

Mr. Chandrasekar Palanisamy, LTA Group Director (traffic and road operations), said, "We urge both drivers and commuters to be socially responsible and comply with the Covid-19 circuit breaker measures." People who need to travel can use public transport, taxis or private hire car services.

Those hailing taxis in the street should scan the QR code in the car to provide their contact details or visit this website so contact tracing will be easier if needed. Taxi drivers have also been told to issue receipts for rides, which passengers should keep for at least 14 days.