Marussia and Caterham "may not be the last" Formula One teams to go bust, given the incredibly high cost of grand prix racing
More teams could fail, says Mosley Marussia's Jules Bianchi (front) leading Caterham's Kamui Kobayashi in the rain-hit Japanese Grand Prix on Oct 5.-- PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Marussia and Caterham "may not be the last" Formula One teams to go bust, given the incredibly high cost of grand prix racing, said Max Mosley, the former head of world motor sports governing body FIA, after Marussia became the second team in four days, following Caterham, to enter administration.

Mosley, who headed the FIA from 1993 to 2009, was saddened but not surprised by recent events.

"It's not a fair competition any more," he told BBC Radio Five. "The big problem is that the big teams have so much more money than teams like Caterham and Marussia," the 74-year-old Englishman added. "In the end, they (teams such as Caterham and Marussia) were bound to drop off - and they may not be the last."

His plans for a cost cap in 2009 were rejected and a similar scheme designed to take effect from next season fell through earlier this year.

But he said the current system was unsustainable. "From a sporting point of view, the sport should split the money equally and then let the teams get as much sponsorship as they can.

"A team like Ferrari will always get more sponsorship than Marussia, but if they all get the same basic money, then they all start on a level playing field, particularly if you have a cost cap where you limit the amount of money each is allowed to spend."

Mosley added that it was no coincidence that Marussia and Caterham had experienced financial meltdown this season, following the introduction of environmentally friendly engines at double the cost of previous units.

"I'm in favour of the greener engines," he said. "The mistake was not saying to the big manufacturers that you can spend as much as you want on research but the maximum you can charge per season is something like £3 million (S$6.2 million) to £4 million instead of the £15 million to £20 million, which I believe it is now."