The Maxus D90 is a seven-seater SUV which will please the plus-size crowd
Maxus D90 is one big winner Despite its proportions, the Maxus D90 manages to hold itself well on the Tianma circuit. PHOTO: JULIAN KHO AND MAXUS

Good things do not always come in small packages. Take the Maxus D90, for instance.

Measuring over 5m from tip to tip and with a width of over 1.9m, it is a giant among SUVs.
Thus, finding a suitable competitor to the D90 is not easy. The closest that comes to mind is the Toyota Fortuner.
Against the Japanese seven-seater, the Chinese stands tall. Its wheelbase of 2,950mm is substantially longer than the Fortuner's 2,745mm. This translates to a cabin that is ridiculously roomy for all three rows of passengers.
In fact, it is so spacious that second-row occupants can sit cross-legged with room to spare.
But there is one thing which makes the D90 not as appealing as the Fortuner. Second-row seats can be folded, but not flipped up. In the Fortuner, these seats can be folded and flipped up completely to make ingress and egress easier for third-row occupants.
SPECS / MAXUS D90
Price: To be announced
Engine: 1,995cc 16-valve inline-4 turbocharged
Transmission: Six-speed automatic with manual select
Power: 221bhp at 5,000rpm
Torque: 360Nm at 2,500rpm
0-100kmh: 9.8 seconds
Top speed: 175kmh
Fuel consumption: 9.8 litres/100km
Agent: Cycle & Carriage
But what it lacks in seating versatility, the China-made SUV makes up for with useful features that are on a par with even the German makes (in quantity, if not in quality). The first thing you notice when you climb onboard is its 12.3-inch high-definition touchscreen media display.
There is also a digital instrument cluster, something which is usually found in premium models.
Electric parking brake with auto hold function, engine stop-start, ventilated seats, blind-spot detection, lane departure warning and six different drive modes are all standard fare. There is even a panoramic sunroof and a three-pin power socket.
Once onboard, you are immediately aware of how high up you are.
How does this big and tall vehicle handle? I soon find out on the 2km-long Tianma circuit.
With access to 221bhp and 360Nm of torque from its 2-litre turbocharged engine, the D90 feels surprisingly quick on the straights. The all-wheel-drive behemoth also manages to hold itself well around sweeping bends and tight corners.
But given its stature, diving under hard braking and body roll are simply inevitable.
Still, buyers of this car will not be particular about its handling and dynamism. Instead, its ability to ferry family members in comfort is what counts. For that, the D90 will not fail.
Unfortunately, the model is not Euro 6-compliant yet. So, it will be some time before it arrives in Singapore.
Measuring over 5m from tip to tip and with a width of over 1.9m, it is a giant among SUVs.

Thus, finding a suitable competitor to the D90 is not easy. The closest that comes to mind is the Toyota Fortuner.

Against the Japanese seven-seater, the Chinese stands tall. Its wheelbase of 2,950mm is substantially longer than the Fortuner's 2,745mm. This translates to a cabin that is ridiculously roomy for all three rows of passengers.

In fact, it is so spacious that second-row occupants can sit cross-legged with room to spare.

But there is one thing which makes the D90 not as appealing as the Fortuner. Second-row seats can be folded, but not flipped up. In the Fortuner, these seats can be folded and flipped up completely to make ingress and egress easier for third-row occupants.

But what it lacks in seating versatility, the China-made SUV makes up for with useful features that are on a par with even the German makes (in quantity, if not in quality). The first thing you notice when you climb onboard is its 12.3-inch high-definition touchscreen media display.

There is also a digital instrument cluster, something which is usually found in premium models.

Electric parking brake with auto hold function, engine stop-start, ventilated seats, blind-spot detection, lane departure warning and six different drive modes are all standard fare. There is even a panoramic sunroof and a three-pin power socket.

Once onboard, you are immediately aware of how high up you are.

How does this big and tall vehicle handle? I soon find out on the 2km-long Tianma circuit.

With access to 221bhp and 360Nm of torque from its 2-litre turbocharged engine, the D90 feels surprisingly quick on the straights. The all-wheel-drive behemoth also manages to hold itself well around sweeping bends and tight corners.

But given its stature, diving under hard braking and body roll are simply inevitable.

Still, buyers of this car will not be particular about its handling and dynamism. Instead, its ability to ferry family members in comfort is what counts. For that, the D90 will not fail.

Unfortunately, the model is not Euro 6-compliant yet. So, it will be some time before it arrives in Singapore.