Lamborghini's final Aventador variant - the SV-J - is a track-focused machine with a high fun quotient
Lamborghini's Aventador SV-J: Last, but not least The Lamborghini Aventador SV-J is equipped with a reworked V12 engine, which provides more power and torque from idle to the red line. PHOTO: LAMBORGHINI

In July, the Lamborghini Aventador SV-J or Superveloce-Jota (jota is Spanish for the letter J, referring to a race cateogry) set a new record on the legendary German Nurburgring race track.

Its time of six minutes and 44.97 seconds undercut the previous record holder - Porsche's 911 GT2 RS - by more than two seconds.
To achieve that, the Aventador SV-J - the final Aventador variant before the car is replaced by an all-new model - had to have three key elements.
First is power. The car's V12 is a reworked engine with lightweight titanium valves that snap open faster and remain open longer - allowing more air to flow in.
Internal engine friction is reduced and the reworked exhaust now sounds as if it has no muffler at all. The corollary of all that is not just more peak power, but also more power and torque from idle to the red line.
Second is aerodynamics. The SV-J can develop up to 350kg of downforce at 300kmh and yet has a lower drag than the Aventador SV. Its aerodynamic package is active, giving the car extra stability when cornering fast and allowing it to breach 350kmh.
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Handling completes the equation. The Aventador SV-J is an all-wheel-drive supercar with rear-wheel steer. It rides on an adapative suspension system and its handling characteristics in its three drive modes - Strada, Sport or Corsa - are coordinated by a master system called LDVA 2.0 (Lamborghini Dinamica Veicolo Attiva).
SPECS / LAMBORGHINI AVENTADOR SV-J
Price: $1.98 million without COE when it arrives in February next year
Engine: 6,498cc 48-valve V12
Transmission: Seven-speed automated manual with paddle shift
Power: 770hp at 8,500rpm
Torque: 720Nm at 6,750rpm
0-100kmh: 2.8 seconds
Top speed: Over 350kmh
Fuel consumption: 19.6 litres/100km
Agent: Lamborghini Singapore
This test-drive reveals that Sport mode allows most of its power to go to the rear wheels. With less electronic intervention, the car can deliver some oversteer fun like a rear-wheel-drive.
Corsa is a no-nonsense mode that does not allow for much oversteer, keeping a tight rein on things to keep to the best line to achieve the neatest, fastest lap as long as the driver is willing to shift gears himself. Automatic shifts are available only in Strada and Sport.
The SV-J's automated manual transmission still attracts controversy, but it suits the hardcore nature of the car.
It takes a few laps to come to grips with the SV-J's considerable power, especially in high-speed corners. It is most throttle-sensitive in Sport, while Corsa gives the car a more stable and positive feel. At cornering limits, it is more effective to guide the car with the throttle than solely relying on the steering.
With the ability to grip, slip and slide at will, the SV-J is the most enjoyable of a recent crop of supercars. At the same time, it has the looks, sounds and attitude to really intimidate.
There is no street drive, so it is unclear how the car will behave on normal roads. But it should not be too different from the SV.
If you want one, be quick. The car has a production limit of just 900 units, with most already spoken for.
Its time of six minutes and 44.97 seconds undercut the previous record holder - Porsche's 911 GT2 RS - by more than two seconds.

To achieve that, the Aventador SV-J - the final Aventador variant before the car is replaced by an all-new model - had to have three key elements.

First is power. The car's V12 is a reworked engine with lightweight titanium valves that snap open faster and remain open longer - allowing more air to flow in.

Internal engine friction is reduced and the reworked exhaust now sounds as if it has no muffler at all. The corollary of all that is not just more peak power, but also more power and torque from idle to the red line.

Second is aerodynamics. The SV-J can develop up to 350kg of downforce at 300kmh and yet has a lower drag than the Aventador SV. Its aerodynamic package is active, giving the car extra stability when cornering fast and allowing it to breach 350kmh.

Handling completes the equation. The Aventador SV-J is an all-wheel-drive supercar with rear-wheel steer. It rides on an adapative suspension system and its handling characteristics in its three drive modes - Strada, Sport or Corsa - are coordinated by a master system called LDVA 2.0 (Lamborghini Dinamica Veicolo Attiva).

This test-drive reveals that Sport mode allows most of its power to go to the rear wheels. With less electronic intervention, the car can deliver some oversteer fun like a rear-wheel-drive.

Corsa is a no-nonsense mode that does not allow for much oversteer, keeping a tight rein on things to keep to the best line to achieve the neatest, fastest lap as long as the driver is willing to shift gears himself. Automatic shifts are available only in Strada and Sport.

The SV-J's automated manual transmission still attracts controversy, but it suits the hardcore nature of the car.

It takes a few laps to come to grips with the SV-J's considerable power, especially in high-speed corners. It is most throttle-sensitive in Sport, while Corsa gives the car a more stable and positive feel. At cornering limits, it is more effective to guide the car with the throttle than solely relying on the steering.

With the ability to grip, slip and slide at will, the SV-J is the most enjoyable of a recent crop of supercars. At the same time, it has the looks, sounds and attitude to really intimidate.

There is no street drive, so it is unclear how the car will behave on normal roads. But it should not be too different from the SV.

If you want one, be quick. The car has a production limit of just 900 units, with most already spoken for.