Porsche gives its 911 Turbo S a Midas touch and a million-dollar price tag
Going for gold The 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series has a signature "Gold" paint job with stripes of exposed carbon-fibre woven in a glossy finish. PHOTO: PORSCHE

Over the years, the Porsche Exclusive department has created limited-edition models like the 1993 911 Turbo slant-nose, the 2009 911 Sport Classic and the 2011 911 Speedster, among many others.

Most of these do not end up as a mainstream model, but one did - the 911 Turbo S in 2003.

The department has now been re-branded as Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur and the first model to be introduced under the new name is the 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series.

Compared to the 580hp 911 Turbo S, the Exclusive Series gets an extra 27hp lift to 607hp and its torque rises from 700Nm to 750Nm.

Like the 911 Turbo S, it clocks a 2.9-second century sprint. But it is 0.3 seconds quicker to 200kmh, accomplishing the dash in 9.6 seconds. Top speed remains at 330kmh.

The car's bonnet, fenders, wing mirrors, air-intake scoop, rear wing, roof and front and rear spoilers are made of carbon-fibre.

It wears a signature "Gold" paint job with stripes of exposed carbon-fibre woven in a glossy finish.

Then, there are the "Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur" plaques on the front wings as well as on the side skirts.

Inside, there is the usual choice of leather or Alcantara, with decorative stitching. Hard surfaces like cappings and surrounds can be in metallic, piano black or carbon-fibre finish.

And as if there isn't enough bling, Porsche applied gold-coloured metallic thread woven into all the carbon-fibre elements.

There are many other ways to customise the interior, including having special graphics on the instrument cluster and a bespoke Porsche Design Chronograph.

As the chassis is taken wholesale from the Turbo S, the drive experience is as expected - fabulous.

The rock-steady way in which the Turbo S Exclusive Series swallows huge distances is unrivalled. It readily cruises at 200kmh as if it were travelling at half that speed.

Its all-wheel-drive system is a real boon in inclement weather, making the Porsche a true everyday supercar and not just a fair-weather toy.

All the carbon-fibre bits probably lower the car's weight, but Porsche's main goal is not to set a new record at Nurburgring with this car. Rather, the exercise is to create a unique 911.

At well over $1 million, you would be wondering if you could customise a 911 Turbo S yourself. Of course you could, but you might end up spending more.

Also, you would not belong to an exclusive "club", since the 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series is an official limited-edition model with a production run of 500 units, each complete with its own serial number and certification.